On the Trail of Drexel Drake’s Falcon

An On-Going Investigation by Frank Derato I have always enjoyed the Falcon films with Tom Conway and the other night, while watching one I noticed that Michael Arlen is credited with having created the character. A little googling revealed that Arlen supposedly created the character in "Gay Falcon," a 1940 short story. But what about … Continue reading On the Trail of Drexel Drake’s Falcon

T.S. Eliot’s Rules of English Detective Stories (Boiled Down)

EDITOR'S NOTE Renowned poet and certified literary big shot T.S. Eliot has a bigger connection to crime fiction than you might expect -- he was a fan and an early defender of the genre. He was -- get this -- the mystery reviewer for The Criterion (later The New Criterion),a prestigious British literary journal (1922-39) founded by Eliot, … Continue reading T.S. Eliot’s Rules of English Detective Stories (Boiled Down)

Lester Dent’s Rogues Gallery

An Ever-Growing List of Lester Dent's Detective Characters Kenneth Robeson was the prolific author of about a jillion pulp stories, and was best known as the creator of the Doc Savage series. But his real name was Lester Dent. And under that name and an avalanche of other pseudonyms and house names that included H.O. Cash, … Continue reading Lester Dent’s Rogues Gallery

The Pulp Paper Master Fiction Plot

EDITOR'S NOTE: Lester Dent (1904 - 1959) was a prolific author of about a million pulp stories, best known -- at least among pulp fans -- as the main author of the Doc Savage series, under the pen name of Kenneth Robeson. But he was more, much more than that. In addition to the Doc … Continue reading The Pulp Paper Master Fiction Plot

“I Dunit”

EDITOR'S NOTE: This one's taken from the third and final issue of P.S. Magazine, a general interest magazine from the 1960s. It was their August 1966 issue, and it was dedicated to "the rise of the gumshoe" and included an interview with Rex Stout,  "The White Rabbit Caper," a tongue-in-cheek detective story by James Thurber, an essay … Continue reading “I Dunit”

Craig Rice on “How To Write a Mystery Novel”

A bestselling mystery author reveals all. The ever-cheeky Craig Rice had a slew of bestselling mysteries under her belt, including such classics as The Big Budget Murders, Having a Wonderful Crime and Home Sweet Homicide, when she appeared on the cover of Time -- the first mystery writer to do so. But it wasn't the first time she was … Continue reading Craig Rice on “How To Write a Mystery Novel”

Father Knox’s Decalogue: The Ten Rules of (Golden Age) Detective Fiction

EDITOR'S NOTE Monsignor Ronald A. Knox (1888-1957) was a British clergyman, editor, a literary critic, a humourist and a detective story writer himself who nicely laid out, with a gentle wit, the "ten rules" that guided detective fiction in its so-called Golden Age. They appeared in his preface to Best Detective Stories of 1928, an … Continue reading Father Knox’s Decalogue: The Ten Rules of (Golden Age) Detective Fiction

Bald Trickery: S.S. Van Dine’s Twenty Rules for Writing Detective Stories

EDITOR'S NOTE S.S. Van Dine (1888-1939, real name Willard Huntington Wright) was one of the most popular American mystery writers of the twenties and thirties, and his wealthy amateur sleuth Philo Vance remains one of the great fictional detectives, if not also one of the most insufferable. Read today, Vance comes off as a pompous, … Continue reading Bald Trickery: S.S. Van Dine’s Twenty Rules for Writing Detective Stories

Erle Stanley Gardner

Pseudonyms include A.A. Fair, Grant Holiday, Carleton Kendrake, Charles J. Kenney, Charles M. Green,  Kyle Corning (1889-1970) Although critics sneered and many felt that Erle Stanley Gardner was not a very good writer (Rex Stout, for example, once claimed that the Perry Mason books weren't even novels), ERLE STANLEY GARDNER was one of the bestselling writers of … Continue reading Erle Stanley Gardner

Pulp Fiction Chez Vous: An Introduction to David Montrose’s The Body on Mont-Royal

By Kevin Burton Smith Here we are. David Montrose's The Body on Mont-Royal. The third and final of his books to feature private eye Russell Teed. First published in 1953, by Harlequin. Yes, Harlequin. And now it's finally back in print. Pulp fiction chez nous. As vivid as Raymond Chandler's Los Angeles, as Montreal as … Continue reading Pulp Fiction Chez Vous: An Introduction to David Montrose’s The Body on Mont-Royal