Helen Keremos

Created by Eve Zaremba Back in the eighties, The Globe and Mail called HELEN KEREMOS "the best of the feminist lesbian detectives." I'm not sure about the best, but she certainly was one of the first, and certainly the first (1978) to be printed by a mainstream press (Paperjacks). Personally, I found her a little … Continue reading Helen Keremos

Pete Fernandez

Created by Alex Segura Everything's definitely not Archie in this one. Alex Segura rocked the boat with his 2013 debut, Silent City, which introduced us to PETE FERNANDEZ, a man who seems to drag around his own personal dark cloud. He's recently been shitcanned from his copywriting newspaper gig, dumped by his fiancée and then … Continue reading Pete Fernandez

These Were a Few of My Favourite Things (2018)

    The Man Who Came Uptown  by George Pelecanos | Buy this book | Buy the audio | Kindle it! Pelecanos takes a break from HBO’s The Deuce to deliver this taut, nervy salute to the redemptive power of the written word and to those who try to make the world a better place. Michael, a soft-spoken young DC knucklehead finds … Continue reading These Were a Few of My Favourite Things (2018)

Perry Mason

Created by Erle Stanley Gardner (1889-1970) PERRY MASON is Raymond Burr as a Defense Attorney, right? Not a P.I., right? Well, sorta. In the first ten or so books by pulpmeister Erle Stanley Gardner, Perry comes off as a particularly hard-boiled lawyer/detective, throwing his weight around, breaking and entering, and other private eye shenanigans, not above … Continue reading Perry Mason

Father Knox’s Decalogue: The Ten Rules of (Golden Age) Detective Fiction

EDITOR'S NOTE Monsignor Ronald A. Knox (1888-1957) was a British clergyman, editor, a literary critic, a humourist and a detective story writer himself who nicely laid out, with a gentle wit, the "ten rules" that guided detective fiction in its so-called Golden Age. They appeared in his preface to Best Detective Stories of 1928, an … Continue reading Father Knox’s Decalogue: The Ten Rules of (Golden Age) Detective Fiction

Bald Trickery: S.S. Van Dine’s Twenty Rules for Writing Detective Stories

EDITOR'S NOTE S.S. Van Dine (1888-1939, real name Willard Huntington Wright) was one of the most popular American mystery writers of the twenties and thirties, and his wealthy amateur sleuth Philo Vance remains one of the great fictional detectives, if not also one of the most insufferable. Read today, Vance comes off as a pompous, … Continue reading Bald Trickery: S.S. Van Dine’s Twenty Rules for Writing Detective Stories

Charlie Bradshaw

Created by Stephen Dobyns "I'm the kind of guy that doesn't trust beauty. Like it's a distraction. You stand there staring at the posies, thinking how pretty they are and then whap, something smacks you from behind. When my wife was dying, the doctors gave her morphine to take her mind off her troubles: beauty … Continue reading Charlie Bradshaw

And while we’re at it, what the hell is “Noir”?

Originally noir, at least in English, meant film, but now it's used to describe everything from literature to music. And perfume. And lingerie. And coffee beans. And breath mints. And lawnmowers, probably. And everyone seems to have a slightly different definition of it. But once upon a time, it meant something. The formal definition is something … Continue reading And while we’re at it, what the hell is “Noir”?

Murray Kirk

Created by Stanley Ellin Rich, classy man-about-town MURRAY KIRK is a former hotshot young lawyer who takes over as the head of New York's very respectable Conmy and Kirk Detective Agency in Stanley Ellin's Edgar-winning The Eighth Circle (1958). There's no low rent office with a bottle in the drawer for this baby. Nope. Murray's … Continue reading Murray Kirk

Pulp Fiction Chez Vous: An Introduction to David Montrose’s The Body on Mont-Royal

By Kevin Burton Smith Here we are. David Montrose's The Body on Mont-Royal. The third and final of his books to feature private eye Russell Teed. First published in 1953, by Harlequin. Yes, Harlequin. And now it's finally back in print. Pulp fiction chez nous. As vivid as Raymond Chandler's Los Angeles, as Montreal as … Continue reading Pulp Fiction Chez Vous: An Introduction to David Montrose’s The Body on Mont-Royal