How Does It Feel?

Bob Dylan and Crime Fiction Bob Dylan and his music have always had ties to crime and detective fiction. On his first album, Bob Dylan (1962), he mostly covered traditional folk songs, including "The House of the Rising Sun," which deals with prostitution. But he was soon writing his own songs, and particularly during his early years, … Continue reading How Does It Feel?

How Does It Feel? Part Two

Private eye titles lifted from Bob Dylan lyrics The Dylan/private eye connection continues. I've just started fooling around with this one, so any suggestions and/or comments are more than welcome.... Amphetamines and Pearls (1976, by John Harvey, featuring private eye Scott Mitchell) From "Just Like a Woman" The Geranium Kiss (1977, by John Harvey, featuring … Continue reading How Does It Feel? Part Two

My Scrapbook: Bob Dylan, Private Eye

My Scrapbook Bob Dylan, Private Eye Back in September 2018, Ayun Halliday (no relation to Brett) and Todd Alcott of Open Culture (the self-proclaimed "best free cultural and educational media on the web") had a little fun at Bob Dylan's expense, presenting "Classic Songs by Bob Dylan Re-Imagined as Pulp Fiction Book Covers," featuring text by Halliday and a … Continue reading My Scrapbook: Bob Dylan, Private Eye

My Scrapbook: Darwyn Cooke’s Color Model Sheet for Slam Bradley

My Scrapbook Darwyn Cooke's Color Model Sheet for Slam Bradley (March 2001) Say what you will about Slam Bradley, arguably DC Comics' longest running detective character (first appearance: Detective Comics #1), but his revival in 2001 in a four-part backup that ran in issues #759-762 of that magazine may be the greatest and most sincere … Continue reading My Scrapbook: Darwyn Cooke’s Color Model Sheet for Slam Bradley

Sunset

A Son Says Goodbye... W. Glenn Duncan (1940-2019) Sunset. A secluded location on the shores of Lake Texoma, Texas. The sun wavered on the horizon across the water. Hung there like it knew its job was to finish setting, but it wanted to give our motley group just a little more light, more warmth, more … Continue reading Sunset

Murder in the Library: The Crime Mags

Non-Fiction in a Periodical Vein Yeah, it's obvious that not all these print magazines are exclusively non-fiction. Most of them have, will or are willing to include the occasional bit of fiction alongside the usual non-fiction news, views, reviews and interviews, so there's bound to be some cross-over with the magazines listed on Murder in … Continue reading Murder in the Library: The Crime Mags

On the Trail of Drexel Drake’s Falcon

An On-Going Investigation by Frank Derato I have always enjoyed the Falcon films with Tom Conway and the other night, while watching one I noticed that Michael Arlen is credited with having created the character. A little googling revealed that Arlen supposedly created the character in "Gay Falcon," a 1940 short story. But what about … Continue reading On the Trail of Drexel Drake’s Falcon

Murder in the Library: True Detectives (Non-fiction by Real Life Eyes)

What? You thought I made this all up, or downloaded it all from Wikipedia? Nope. Here are the books that inspired me to create this site, and the books I've used to cobble it together over the years, as well as the ones I've discovered along the way. If you like this site, you may … Continue reading Murder in the Library: True Detectives (Non-fiction by Real Life Eyes)

Eugène François Vidocq

(1775-1857) EUGÈNE FRANÇOIS VIDOCQ was the world's first private detective, as we generally understand the term. He also  killed his first man at fourteen, and once posed as a cannibal in a traveling show. Well, maybe. I say "maybe" because almost everything we know about Vidocq comes from Vidocq himself and other, often contradictory sources. Like … Continue reading Eugène François Vidocq

The National Lampoon

If You Don't Click This Link, We'll Kill the Dick National Lampoon, that cheeky, irreverent kid brother to MAD Magazine that  ran from 1970 to 1998, tried to act like the older brother. They offered "adult humour," theoretically aimed at a more sophisticated, mature crowd. But really, who were they trying to kid? It was … Continue reading The National Lampoon